Jason-Gardiner

Is Jason Gardiner set to reprise his role as judge on Dancing On Ice?

Dancing On Ice returns to ITV next year with an all-star judging panel

Sharnaz Shahid

Jason Gardiner has confirmed he is set to reprise his role on Dancing On Ice when the ITV ice-skating competition show returns in 2018. The 45-year-old choreographer will take his seat alongside Diversity star Ashley Banjo as well as Olympic skaters Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean in the newly-revamped line-up. Appearing on Wednesday's Lorraine, Jason discusses his "blunt" judging style, telling stand-in host Christine Lampard: "I'm honest. As you know, I always call it as I see it. But similarly when they're good I give them great praise." He added: "It's one of the hardest [shows to do], I think. The commitment is intense for them. Let's not discount what they have to go through. We have seen some remarkable people come through Dancing on Ice. To see that journey is wonderful. I've really loved that."

Jason Gardiner is the final judge confirmed for Dancing On Ice

When asked about being joined by Jayne and Christopher on the panel, the Australian star replied: "It's going to be wonderful to see that. There's no question, they are ice skating royalty. Their credentials stack up. However, it's the first time they've judged and, I know everybody thinks, they sit at home, everyone's got an opinion, but it is quite difficult to be a good judge on these shows and remain impartial." Meanwhile, last month, it was also announced that Holly Willoughby and her This Morning co-host Phillip Schofield are teaming up again to host the beloved series. Each week, celebrities and their professional skaters will perform in a bid to impress both the panel and the viewers at home.

Holly Willoughby and Phillip Schofield will be back hosting the show

Dancing On Ice: Ashley Banjo confirmed to join judging panel

Although the celebrity line-up is yet to be revealed, Jason went on to insist that he will not go into the show with any preconceptions. "I'm not going in with preconceived ideas of how I'm going to be, you have to be there and assess it that moment," he added. "I think it's only fair to the contestants to go in there open and ready to give them the critique. But at the end of the day I have to judge and being a judge is not necessarily who I am but it's a role that I have to do in order to get my point across. So ultimately it benefits the show and the contestants."

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